The establishment of various utopian communities between the 17 19th centuries

Anthony and Lucy Stone. Confusion, uncertainty, and great inconsistencies, must exist on this point, so long as woman is regarded in the least degree inferior to man; but place her where her Maker placed her, on the same high level of human rights with man, side by side with him, and difficulties vanish, the mountains of perplexity flow down at the presence of this grand equalizing principle. What was the position of Beecher concerning the role of women in American society? Was she a proponent of the Cult of Domesticity?

The establishment of various utopian communities between the 17 19th centuries

Bring fact-checked results to the top of your browser search. Native American history The thoughts and perspectives of indigenous individuals, especially those who lived during the 15th through 19th centuries, have survived in written form less often than is optimal for the historian.

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Because such documents are extremely rare, those interested in the Native American past also draw information from traditional artsfolk literaturefolklorearchaeologyand other sources.

Powhatan village of SecotonPowhatan village of Secoton, colour engraving by Theodor de Bry,after a watercolour drawing by John White, c.

As one would expect, indigenous American farmers living in stratified societies, such as the Natchezengaged with Europeans differently than did those who relied on hunting and gathering, such as the Apache.

Likewise, Spanish conquistadors were engaged in a fundamentally different kind of colonial enterprise than were their counterparts from France or England.

Utopias -- Shaker Historic Trail -- National Register of Historic Places

The sections below consider broad trends in Native American history from the late 15th century to the late 20th century. More-recent events are considered in the final part of this article, Developments in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

North America and Europe circa The population of Native America Scholarly estimates of the pre-Columbian population of Northern America have differed by millions of individuals: In anthropologist James Mooney undertook the first thorough investigation of the problem.

He estimated the precontact population density of each culture area based on historical accounts and carrying capacity, an estimate of the number of people who could be supported by a given form of subsistence. Mooney concluded that approximately 1, individuals lived in Northern America at the time of Columbian landfall.

In ethnohistorian Henry Dobyns estimated that there were between 9, and 12, people north of the Rio Grande before contact; in he revised that number upward to 18, people.

The establishment of various utopian communities between the 17 19th centuries

Dobyns was among the first scholars to seriously consider the effects of epidemic diseases on indigenous demographic change. He noted that, during the reliably recorded epidemics of the 19th century, introduced diseases such as smallpox had combined with various secondary effects i.

Utopian Societies The Amana Colonies National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary

He then used this and other information to calculate from early census data backward to probable founding populations.

Some of his critics fault Dobyns for the disjunctions between physical evidence and his results, as when the number of houses archaeologists find at a site suggests a smaller population than do his models of demographic recovery.

Others, including the historian David Henige, criticize some of the assumptions Dobyns made in his analyses. For instance, many early fur traders noted the approximate number of warriors fielded by a tribe but neglected to mention the size of the general population.

This group notes that severe epidemics of European diseases may have begun in North America in the late 10th or early 11th century, when the Norse briefly settled a region they called Vinland.

Yet another group of demographers protest that an emphasis on population loss obscures the resilience shown by indigenous peoples in the face of conquest.

Most common, however, is a middle position that acknowledges that demographic models of 15th-century Native America must be treated with caution, while also accepting that the direct and indirect effects of the European conquest included extraordinary levels of indigenous mortality not only from introduced diseases but also from battles, slave raids, and—for those displaced by these events—starvation and exposure.

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This perspective acknowledges both the resiliency of Native American peoples and cultures and the suffering they bore.The sections below consider broad trends in Native American history from the late 15th century to the late 20th century.

More-recent events are considered in the final part of this article, Developments in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The Oneida Community in New York Oneida’s Mansion House The Oneida Community was a Perfectionist communal society dedicated to living as one family and .

A list of American Utopian communities. s Name Location Founder Founding Date Ending Date Notes Hebus Valley Pennsylvania George Rapp A Harmonites Village.

The Harmony Society is a Christian theosophy and pietist society founded in Iptingen, Germany, in Western Utopianism underwent an intellectual and practical transformation in the 18th and 19th centuries. For the first time in western history, it was becoming a realistic possibility to create new, preferable, and utopian societies.

History From the 19th to midth centuries. Karl Marx believed that science and democracy were the right and left hands of what he called the move from the realm of necessity to the realm of freedom.

He argued that advances in science helped delegitimize the rule of kings and the power of the Christian Church.

The establishment of various utopian communities between the 17 19th centuries

Gradually, utopian communities came to reflect social perfectibility rather than religious purity. Robert Owen, for example, believed in economic and political equality. Those principles, plus the absence of a particular religious creed, were the founding principles of his New Harmony, Indiana, cooperative that lasted for only two years before economic failure.

The establishment of various utopian communities between the 17 19th centuries